www.teflons-torque.com, Teflon's Torque, Tef's-tQ, Teflon-Mike's Web-Site

  HOME Learner-Riders Workshop General Scrap-Book Miscellaneous e-mail  

 Little Dream 07 - 'the Corporal'

Part 5

Tackling the Plastic's

1986 Honda CB125TD-C - Renovation

The original plan was to make good the bikes original bodywork, and repaint & decal it. But, with the bike 'sort' of serviceable, after doing all the plastic repairs, the original bodywork was re-fitted, unpainted so that Donna could use the bike as a 'get-about', and a SECOND set of panels was sorted out from the heap, to make the finished bike! But here goes, some of the work, on both sets of panels!

1986 Honda CB125TD-C - Renovation

The first job was to repair any cracks in the plastic, this was done with plastic welding, using a 15W soldering iron, and bits of scrap plastic cut from cracked staka-boxes and coat-hangers as filler-rod. Here I am stitching a crack in the corner of the Right Hand Side-Panel.

1986 Honda CB125TD-C - Renovation

A number of side panel lugs had been snapped off, and gone missing. Sometimes you find the stub of the lug still left in the rubber grommet; but not on this one, & the side-panels had been drilled and held on with bits of electrical wire! So new lugs were needed, and I made them from welding bits of scrap plastic together, and then sculpting it to shape with the soldering iron.

1986 Honda CB125TD-C - Renovation

Once crafted, the new lugs could be welded into the side-panel, with yet more plastic welding.

1986 Honda CB125TD-C - Renovation

For the 'long' lug at the back of the panel, I attached the replacement lug to the panel first, then adjusted the angle to get it to locate over its frame grommet, before moulding the head, and working it down to get the height 'right'

1986 Honda CB125TD-C - Renovation

This panel had been quite badly damaged. It had cracks around the rim, where it had been stressed by over-opening the seat, as well as cracks around where the lugs had originally attached. These had to be welded up while attaching the new lugs, but the amount of 'work' in the area did cause some surface distortion in one or two areas. But no matter, the areas could be built up with plastic weld, and then the areas filed and sanded back to shape.

1986 Honda CB125TD-C - Renovation

The different colour 'filler' plastic shows where the repair has been made.

1986 Honda CB125TD-C - Renovation

The tail cowlings needed similar attention. They have a nice aluminium support rail, that makes them a tad more robust than on many bikes where the bodywork is entirely self supporting; BUT, the plastic is held on with THE silliest little lugs that have been snapped off on every bike I have taken apart... and that's getting to be quite a few now!

1986 Honda CB125TD-C - Renovation

Using the support rail as a 'Jig' to align the snapped lug, the broken bit of plastic was first 'stitched' back into place.

1986 Honda CB125TD-C - Renovation

Then the joint was built up with filler and blended over a wide area for strength.

1986 Honda CB125TD-C - Renovation

One of the rear lugs was also broken on this cowling, and some damage had been done around one of the holes for the grab-rail bolts.

1986 Honda CB125TD-C - Renovation

All was plastic welded, built up and smoothed to shape.

1986 Honda CB125TD-C - Renovation

More cracks in the inner Mudguard needed repairing, in a similar manner

1986 Honda CB125TD-C - Renovation

 

NEXT: Part 6 - Detailing the Switch-Gear

  HOME Learner-Riders Workshop General Scrap-Book Miscellaneous e-mail  

Hit Counter
stats counter

+ + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + + +